Edward Lincecum

Male 1769 - 1781  (~ 19 years)


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  • Name Edward Lincecum  [1, 2
    Born Between 1762 and 1769  Orange, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Died Jan 1781  Cowpens, Spartanburg, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I9286  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 22 Feb 2020 

    Father Gideon Lincecum,   b. France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1775 and 1783 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Miriam Bowie,   b. Between 1725 and 1749, Maryland, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1813, Eatonton, Putnam, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 88 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married Abt 1760  Maryland, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F2050  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Married South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Linna Lincecum,   b. 1780  [natural]
    Last Modified 22 Feb 2020 
    Family ID F3272  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Between 1762 and 1769 - Orange, North Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Jan 1781 - Cowpens, Spartanburg, South Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - - South Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • -Edward and his brother, John, fought and were killed in the American Revolution. They were captured and shot soon after the Battle of Cowpens.

      *BATTLE OF COWPENS: In December 1780 General Nathanael Greene took command of American forces in the South. He divided his force and continued the "hit-and-run" war on Cornwallis. He sent General daniel Morgan with about 950 men to Cowpens, South Carolina. The British Colonel Banastre Tarleton attacked Morgan there on January 17, 1781. Morgan's force won an overwhelming victory... -Compton's Encyclopedia

      - From Judy Jacobson's Alabama & Mississippi Connections
      "...During the American Revolution, many backwoodsmen were fierce supporters of the rebels. But there were also militant loyalists active in those backwoods. Families were divided and brutality became the routine. But it wasn't until 1778-79, after the fall of Savannah and Augusta, that British troops arrived in the area in force.

      Gideon and Miriam's eldest sons, Edward/Edmund and John were Tories during the American Revolutionary War. On April 10, 1779, both sons were under arrest in South Carolina. According to Wilkes County court records

      John Lyncecum -- Confesses to this Court that he was aiding and assisting in the taking & delivering Capt. David Robinson to the British forces & Noted by some of the Members of this court as an attrocious Villian [sic] do Order him to Confinement till discharg'd by due Course of Law.

      After adjourning, the court met again on April 12th, 1779 and those records included

      Edmund Lyncecum Confeses (sic) that he was with the Indians in arms against the United States & is known to be an attrocious Villian [sic] the Court therefore is of opinion that he be kept in Close Confinement.

      Eventually they were released.

      But the war which pitted brother against brother and father against son was especially vicious in South Carolina. The 1781 Battle of Cowpens was a victory for the patriots who had 12 killed and 61 wounded, which was comparatively light considering the cost to the British. They lost 110 killed, 830 wounded or captured, 800 muskets, 60 slaves, 100 horses and a large quantity of ammunition.

      In his journal, Gideon II merely reported that his uncles had been taken prisoner, but shot soon after the Battle of Cowpens, and never stated on which side they fought. However, because of their previous dealings with the British, it was apparent that John and Edmund Lincecum were two of the 110 killed on the British side. Further, that was even more likely considering that following the war, Miriam "never afterwards heard what went with" her sons, or their wives and children."

  • Sources 
    1. [S650] Lincecum, B. J., Lincecum Genealogy, Featuring "The Lincecum Line" genealogy report dated January 1990.

    2. [S2] Jacobson, Judy, Alabama & Mississippi Connections, Digital images. Jacobson, Judy. Alabama & Mississippi Connections: Historical & Biographical Sketches of Families Who Settled on Both Sides of the Tombigbee River.