Capt., Sgt John P. Lincecum

Male 1820 - 1907  (86 years)


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  • Name John P. Lincecum  [1, 2, 3
    Title Capt., Sgt 
    Born 23 Aug 1820  Columbus, Lowndes, Mississippi, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Gender Male 
    Died 7 Mar 1907  Lincecum, Grant, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3
    Buried Lincecum, Grant, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    • Lincecum Cemetery
    Person ID I7600  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 22 Feb 2020 

    Father Grant Lincecum,   b. Between 1795 and 1804, Hancock, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1862, Dallas, Texas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 67 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Nancy Heych,   b. Between 1793 and 1798, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 1818  [7
    Family ID F2656  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Nancy Victoria Hawthorne,   b. 8 Sep 1840, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Aug 1900  (Age 59 years) 
    Married 17 Apr 1859  Natchitoches, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. William Grant Lincecum,   b. 6 Jul 1868, Grant, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Feb 1924, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years)  [natural]
     2. John Gatlin Lincecum,   b. 5 Mar 1872, Grant, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jan 1955, Grant, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)  [natural]
     3. Dixie G. Lincecum,   b. Between 1863 and 1864, Texas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Mar 1952  (Age ~ 89 years)  [natural]
     4. Reece Green Lincecum,   b. 5 Nov 1875, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Feb 1961, Urania, LaSalle, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)  [natural]
     5. Stella Lincecum,   b. 19 Sep 1879, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Mar 1896  (Age 16 years)  [natural]
     6. Gideon Garfield Lincecum,   b. 9 Aug 1881, Lincecum, Grant, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Oct 1970, Winn, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
     7. Isaac L. Lincecum,   b. Nov 1892, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [Adopted]
     8. Bobbie Lincecum,   b. 24 Feb 1860, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jul 1949, Rapides, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)  [natural]
     9. Tecumseh C. Lincecum,   b. 7 Mar 1873,   d. 30 May 1938  (Age 65 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 22 Feb 2020 
    Family ID F2655  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 23 Aug 1820 - Columbus, Lowndes, Mississippi, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 17 Apr 1859 - Natchitoches, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • Sgt J. P. Lincecum
      Co F
      2 Cav Texas
      State Troops
      C.S.A.

      - Texas General Land Office: Archives and Records Division -- Name Search Results
      1. Unconditional Certificate #183, date: 28 August 1852, John P. Lincecum, issued by Red River County Board of Land Commissioners, 320 acres granted
      2. Transfer, by John P. Lincecum (bears signature) to George F. Lawton, 16 November 1852
      3. Field Notes, survey date: 15 July 1852, by virtue of certificate #183 [see #1 above], 320 acres surveyed in Red River County, abstract #514
      4. Patent #682 (volume 7) issued to George F. Lawton 28 October 1853

      - From "Adjutant Generals Office, July 18th, 1853."
      "I hereby certify that the name of J. P. Lincecum appears on the muster roll of Capt. Saml B. Ortons Co of "Volunteer Mounted Gunmen", as having served in the capacity of 1st Lieut. from the 15th July to the 11th day of August 1841, at which time he was furloughed, [?]" [Signature of Adjt Genl included -- James S. Gillett? Is footnote.com (now fold3.com) the source?]

      John P. Lincecum demanded pay for this stint as 1st Lieutenant via a lawyer, while in Red River County, Texas. Document dated 7th April 1852. John lost his discharge papers, and swore to such in a written statement. This claim was paid in the amount of $30 July 1853. I viewed a certificate, "Public Debt of the Late Republic of Texas," stating such.

      - John Peacham Lincecum was part of Company F of the 2nd Cavalry, Texas State Troops: Co F, Lincecum, J.P., 4th Sgt, enlisted 2 September 1863 at Camp Darnell, by Gen. Hood; on muster roll for the period 2 September to 31 December 1863, "Present"... In June 1863, General Magruder commanding Texas requested Governor Lubbock to call up Texas State Troops to supplement Confederate troops defending the coast and borders of the state. Dallas, Kaufman, and Henderson Counties were in a militia district (called the 13th Brigade). Two drafts of 25% of eligible men were conducted in the three counties, and the men rendezvoused at Camp Darnell near present Crandall in Kaufman County on 2 September 1863. One company of cavalry and one infantry were formed from the Dallas County men (they became Company F, 2nd Cavalry and Company F, 3rd Infantry, Texas State Troops)... Initially, the likely route of Union invasion appeared tobe through the Indian territory, so the men were sent to Bonham to train and organize. By early November, the clear threat was to the coast of Texas, and the 2nd Cavalry was sent to Velasco at the mouth of the Brazos River. They remained there through early 1864. However, many of the men in the Texas State Troops were actually subject to service in the Confederate Army under the CSA conscription acts, so in early 1864, those who were supposed to serve under the conscription acts were transferred to the Confederate Army. The others were sent home where some joined Confederate Reserve Corps Units. The state soon recognized that it would be impossible to maintain a separate organization from the Confederate Army and in May 1864, the Texas State Troops were abolished. [This information was provided to me by Justin M. Sanders of the University of South Alabama]

      - Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana)
      Friday, 11 April 1884 - pg. 1 [via GenealogyBank]
      The Homicide in Grant.

      THE KILLING OF JOHN STARKS BY BRECKENRIDGE STARKS -- THE PURSUIT OF THE MURDERER.
      The Colfax Chronicle, of April 5, says: On Sunday, the 2d day of March, there was an affray in ward five of this parish, between two cousins, in which Breckenridge Starks killed John Starks. We gave a limited account of the affair three weeks ago. Since that time Breckenridge Starks has been hiding out and a large number of the citizens of Grant, assisted by a dozen or more of the citizens of Winn and Catahoula parishes, have been searching for him.

      The desire was universal among all the good people that the perpetrator of the deed should be apprehended and held to answer the demands of law. A posse was formed and search begun, fully 75 or 80 men joining in the hunt. To prevent their giving aid or counsel to Breckenridge, it was considered advisable for a guard to be placed over his father and mother, Christian and Rebecca Starks. For the same reason a watch was put over the family of Mr. J. P. Lincecum, whose daughter was the wife of Breckenridge Starks. No harm was intended to the parties put under surveillance. On the contrary, it was thought by the older and cool-headed citizens to be the best way to protect them from indignity or harm which might be offered by some rash or inconsiderate persons while the excitement was at its height. After keeping watch over them for three days, until a thorough search could be made, they were set free, and Mr. Starks was advised to leave the country for a few days, until the excitement was over. No threat was made, none intended. That Mr. and Mrs. Starks should desire to shield their son was considered nothing but natural, and the only object was to prevent them aiding in his escape.

      Since returning home from a trip through the hills we find the following communication from Mr. Christian Starks:

      Editor Colfax Chronicle -- A few days since a band of lawless men from Catahoula, Winn and Grant, without a warrant or any excuse, save the pretense that it would help them capture Breckenridge Starks, arrested my wife and myself and kept us confined for three days. In order to justify their action they have intimated that there were some charges against me, and invited me to leave the country. Now, sir, this is a country of law and order, or ought to be. The courts are open, and I take this method of informing those men that I not only do not fear but invite investigation of any charges against my honor or honesty, and dare them to the test. One other thing I would like them to know: I have the right to live where I please, and while they may murder me at night, or in the day time, or take the cowardly advantage of numbers against one old man, yet they cannot scare me or run me out of this country. Now, let us see who is doubtful about letting the broad sunlight of day shine upon their actions. If they will not go into the courts of their own free will, I will try to force them there as parties defendant. I don't intend to leave my home and property, and these men had better now understand that the day is passed when a few men can club together and force citizens to leave this country. -- CHRISTIAN STARKS.

      The above letter was received several days ago. Since then warrants have been served upon some eighteen or twenty of the men who engaged in the hunt for Breckenridge Starks, charging them with "conspiring to murder and falsely imprisoning Christian and Rebecca Starks." In addition to those served with warrants, some thirty more came forward and surrendered, and last Wednesday fully sixty men came into Colfax to be present at the preliminary trial held by Judge Blackman, District Attorney E. G. Hunter representing the State. The accused were represented by Attorneys S. M. Brian and W. A. Little, of Winnfield, and through their counsel waived preliminary examination and asked to be placed under bond for appearance at District Court. Judge Blackman ordered that they be held to bail in the sum of $250 each, which was readily given and the accused set at liberty.

      - Obituary transcription from FindAGrave memorial #14969970 (John Peachlyn Lincecum):
      "At his home at Lincecum, Grant parish, La., at 3 p.m. on Thursday, March 7, 1907, Capt. John P. Lincecum, born at Columbus, Miss., August 23, 1820, departed this life aged 86 years, 6 months and 14 days.

      The deceased moved to what is now Grant parish in 1840, and remained here for a number of years. He moved to Clarksville, Red River county, Texas, in the early 50's, and remained there until the beginning of the Civil war, when he joined the Southern army, and was sent to Dallas, Texas. He was put in command of the Post at that place, where he remained to the close of the war, and then came back to this country, at his old home in Grant parish, where the town of Lincecum is now situated, and which was named for him.

      Uncle Johny Lincecum, as he was known to all of the older citizens of Grant parish, was fairly well educated, wrote a good hand, and was a most interesting and able newspaper correspondent. He was a subsciber to the Colfax Chronicle for nearly thirty years. By referring to our files of a generation ago we can find many of his contributions. In those days he took a great interest in all public affairs, was a frequent visitor to Colfax, and his counsels and advice were regarded with great deference. He was of commanding appearance and very sociable disposition, and made and retained friends among young and old alike. Mr. Lincecum being one of the oldest, as well as one of the most noted citizens of Grant parish, we would have been glad to print a more extended history of his life than is contained in this brief notice, but our informant doubtless in his grief over the death of his venerable ancestor overlooked the data necessary for this purpose.

      The deceased leaves six sons and one daughter, all of whom are married and have families, and to whom the Chronicle extends its warmest sympathy.

      Published in The Colfax Chronicle, March 16, 1907"

  • Sources 
    1. [S222] Lineages, Inc., comp. GENE POOL INDIVIDUAL RECORDS. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000.

    2. [S608] 1900 Census of United States, Louisiana, Grant Parish, population Schedule; Online Images, Dwelling and Family #208, John P. Lincecum household.
      Includes sons John G., Tecumseh, and Gideon G.; as well as adopted son Isaac L. Lincecum. This household is next door to William G. Lincecum household (another son of John's)

    3. [S889] The Colfax Chronicle, Louisiana (online archive), "At his home at Lincecum," issued 16 March 1907, accessed 18 November 2016, via FindAGrave memorial #14969970 (John Peachlyn Lincecum).

    4. [S885] 1880 Census of United States, Louisiana, Grant Parish, population Schedule; Online Images, E. D. No. 26, page no. 33, dwelling & family 291, J. P. Lincecum household, accessed November 2016, National Archives and Records Administration credited.
      Includes wife Victoria; daughters Barbry and Stella; and sons D. G., W. G., James G., Tom T., and Robt G.

    5. [S937] 1860 Census of United States, Louisiana, Rapides, Alexandria, population Schedule; Online Images, Page No. 179, dwellings 1284-1287, families 1277-1280, Grant Lyncicum, William Hawthorn, George Hawthorne, and Webster Hawthorn households, accessed March 2017.

    6. [S888] Lincecum Cemetery (Lincecum, Grant Parish, Louisiana), Grave Markers, Image of tombstone via FindAGrave.

    7. [S234] Marriage Records.
      Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: This unique collection of records was extracted from a variety of sources including family group sheets and electronic databases. Originally, the information was derived from an array of materials including pedigree charts, family history articles, querie.