Green Lincecum

Male 1804 - 1833  (~ 31 years)


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  • Name Green Lincecum  [1
    Born Between 1802 and 1804 
    Gender Male 
    Died 1 Nov 1833  Monroe, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I7038  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 22 Feb 2020 

    Father Hezekiah Lincecum,   b. 1770, Warren, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Mar 1839, Lowndes, Mississippi, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Sarah Hickman,   b. 4 Mar 1777, Anson, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 May 1848, Catahoula, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 2 Mar 1791  Warren, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4
    Family ID F2882  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Children 
     1. Van Buren Lincecum,   b. Aft 1830, St Francis, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Oct 1832, St Francis, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 0 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 22 Feb 2020 
    Family ID F2455  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1 Nov 1833 - Monroe, Arkansas, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • - In the book, WHO WAS WHO AMONG THE SOUTHERN INDIANS 1698 - 1907, by Don Martini, published 1998 the following is given:

      LINCECUM, GREEN- White resident among the Chickasaw, was a brother to Gideon Lincecum. He died in St. Francis County, Arkansas in November of 1833.

      Source of info:

      1 James L. Morgan, pg. 36

      - Road Now Open Connecting Memphis to Little Rock

      LITTLE ROCK? Good roads have always been in short supply throughout Arkansas history. In June of 1823, while Arkansas was still a territory, the Arkansas Gazette complained: "We hear from England, France, from Spain, from almost every region of the globe, more regularly and more certainly than we do from some parts of our own territory."

      When Arkansas Territory was created in 1819, there were no real roads of any length in the area. As immigrants moved into the new territory, a trail developed from St. Louis, Missouri, to Texas. The "Southwest Trail" as it became known, ran across Arkansas from the Northeast corner through Little Rock and onto the Southwest.

      Another main road was from Memphis Tennessee, to Little Rock. Built in the 1820s, the road was often called the Memphis Military Road since it was built for Military purposes.

      Building these roads was a tremendous undertaking. Huge swamps stretched across eastern Arkansas, and hundreds of rivers, creeks, and bayous had to be bridged.

      In August of 1827, the U.S. Army signed a contract for the first construction on the Memphis-Little Rock road. The Army had already surveyed the route. For the sum of $70 per mile, Green B. Lincecum of Helena, the contractor, agreed to construct eight miles of the road.

      For that $560, the contractor was expected to construct a road "at least 24 feet wide throughout, and all timber, brush wood, and rubbish . . . . to be removed from it, and all holes within its limits to be filled with earth."

      The really big chore was in cutting down the thousands of trees that stood in the route. All stumps were to be "hollowed towards the center, so as to retain rain and moisture so they would eventually rot away."

      Digging and moving earth was a slow, back-breaking process on the Arkansas frontier. The contract provided that "hills on the route must be dug down, and the road carried around, so as to be practicable for loaded wagons."

      The Memphis-Little Rock road was opened in the summer of 1828. In the August 26, 1828 edition of the Arkansas Gazette, the editor noted that mail from Washington, D.C. arrived in "only 21 days." [Source: Old State House Museum <http://www.oldstatehouse.com>]

  • Sources 
    1. [S650] Lincecum, B. J., Lincecum Genealogy, Featuring "The Lincecum Line" genealogy report dated January 1990.

    2. [S135] Arkansas DAR, Genealogical Records, Volume 13, Collected and Compiled by Mrs. John Nelson Ware, Chairman of Committee, Mrs. Rufus Garrett, Regent.
      February 1936. Deaths from Arkansas Gazette News of Other Days

    3. [S222] Lineages, Inc., comp. GENE POOL INDIVIDUAL RECORDS. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000.

    4. [S2] Jacobson, Judy, Alabama & Mississippi Connections, Digital images. Jacobson, Judy. Alabama & Mississippi Connections: Historical & Biographical Sketches of Families Who Settled on Both Sides of the Tombigbee River.